An Afternoon on Skis

Jan-ski-webSaturday night we got a great snow storm and ended up with about six new inches of snow.   Because we had had so much warm weather the week before we did not have much snow cover left, and it was very welcome.  Sunday morning my husband and I  strapped on our cross skis and head out onto the ranch land behind us for quick excursion.

It was a great ski, but also challenging as the land is full of rolling hills.   It meant that I would be challenged to climb and to navigate skiing downhill on skinny skis.   We also would be forced to negotiate bunch grasses, sage and hidden rocks as we traveled.    It wasn’t long before the morning clouds broke up and the sun was shining.   In spite of subfreezing temps the  sun was starting to change the snow and it was starting to change and cake up on my skis.

I sure enjoyed myself, and the vistas that I was able to see as I skied along the tops of hills.   Oh what fun!

Setting Food By

Today was Bountiful Basket day again and I still had half a case of tomatoes left.   A case of tomatoes is a lot for a family of two.   This morning found my husband and I preparing tomatoes for the freezer before we headed in to town to get our next batch of produce.  All of this reminded me of my mom who was the preservation queen.   What this means is she could figure out a way to put anything by for use to feed our family in the winter.      We were like the Salvation Army of food; nothing was ever turned away or wasted.  She made grape juice one year when some one gave her a couple of bushels of concord grapes.   My family had a recipe for canned carp, that tasted very much like salmon.  Carp were the fish, that the local fishermen did not want and our family could get them for the price of gas to the commercial fisherman’s dock.   The year our freezer failed, my mom was pulling things out and reprocessing them in fruit jars to prevent a loss.   We had a preference for our veggies frozen but that year they were all canned.

I used to can, dehydrate, and freeze quite a bit. I had learned from the best.     I had gotten away from it since moving to Montana ten years ago.   Produce here stinks to put it mildly.   I must admit I was a little intimidated by the alterations that you need to make for the decreased of pressure at this altitude.  I  got rid of my old pressure canner. It was ages old from a rummage sale when I got it and I could not get weight adjustments that I would need for here.   It seemed like the right thing to do.

I do have a “Food Saver”, though I call it a “Seal-a-Meal” (that dates me).   We bought it to use when we butchered our chickens. Today we learned how to use it to save our tomatoes.       I made two batches of a crock-pot  marinara sauce, fire roasted salsa, and prepared cooked tomatoes.   All of these I put by using my vacuum pack system. I must say when I am done, it doesn’t have the same impact of looking at all those pints of tomatoes all lined up in crystal clear Ball jars.  I can say that it was much quicker.    It also allowed me to put up small batches as needed  without hauling all my canning stuff out and then processing for the extended length of time required.     I am not sure that I save much if any money, as these Food Saver bags are not inexpensive or really reusable like fruit jars. I do know that we are going enjoy knowing our chili and spaghetti  meals are made with tomatoes that are not full of salt, and extra’s that we don’t want or need.

This co-op system may have me rethinking about pulling out my dehydrater and if I need to replace my canner.   Stay tuned.